New technology will detect smartphone use while driving

New technology will detect smartphone use while driving

Technology

While in France, the regulation hardens on the phone while driving, other countries take these types of offenses even more seriously. Indeed, in Australia, we are now relying on technological solutions to detect the use of the smartphone while driving.

A significant offense
In France, 16% of motorway accidents are attributable to smartphone use while driving. Indeed, this decrease of vigilance multiplies by three the risk of accident! As explained by France Info on July 9, 2019, regulations are tightening in our country. Now, instead of a fine of 135 euros and three points removed, offenders are directly exposed to a withdrawal of their license.

However, some countries have decided to use technological means to drastically reduce mobile phone use. This is precisely the case of Australia, or more precisely the province of New South Wales, as explained by AP News in an article dated September 23, 2019.

An AI-based device
According to Andrew Constance, Minister of Roads for that province, drunk driving is on a par with mobile phone use. He believes that it is important for the public to know that it will be severely monitored. To do this, the authorities will deploy in December 2019 a series of large-scale devices to detect the use of smartphone driving. No less than 45 Mobile Phone Detection Cameras will be officially responsible for monitoring drivers.

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The device takes the form of two cameras working together. Equipped with an artificial intelligence, the first is intended to control the behavior of the driver to determine precisely whether or not the use of the laptop. The second is focused on the license plate. In case of proven infringement, the driver will have to pay a fine of 232 dollars. However, a human operator must validate each case before any verbalization.

It should be noted that in New South Wales, the device in question has been tested in real life for about six months. To date, the authorities have controlled no less than 8.5 million vehicles and reported about 100,000 offenders. Lastly, it should be noted that drivers will remain legal when using a hands-free kit or Bluetooth.