Health Officials Confirmed First Case of Ebola in Congo City of Goma

Health MedTech

The ongoing Ebola outbreak is the worst-ever recorded in the history of the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC). Health officials had officially declared the epidemic in North Kivu last year on August 1. But the fatal disease continues to spread and demolish other regions of the DRC. Now the Ebola virus has reached the Congolese city of Goma. The area is a major transport hub which often shelters more than 1 million people on the Rwandan border. On Sunday, DRC’s Ministry of Health has confirmed a new case of the disease in the city. The news has increased fears that the virus could pass the vulnerable border and prosper into still-not-infected Rwanda. It is something health experts have tried hard to avoid.

As per Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, director-general of the WHO, confirmation of Ebola case in the Congolese city of Goma is not welcome news. The official notes it is something they have long expected. According to health officials, the patient is a pastor. Besides, the person had arrived in the regional center by bus from the northeastern city of Butembo. Officials noted it is the region where the virus first strike last September. Even more, the authorities checked all the travelers on the bus along with the bus driver. They have admitted the patient to an Ebola treatment center. Thus the ministry assures the risk of spreading the disease in Goma is low. Also, the bus driver and the other 18 passengers will be vaccinated today.

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Ebola is a dangerous virus which causes fever, diarrhea, vomiting, along with other symptoms like impaired functioning of liver and kidney. It can spread through bodily fluids or eating of infected wild animal meat. As of today, a total of 2,489 cases have been reported. While more than 1,600 people in Congo have died due to the virus. According to a report of the health ministry, around 700 people have recovered from infections.